Case Study: Vodafone CVM Game

Transforming Data Use with a Game for Marketers

The Vodafone CVM (Customer Value Management) Data Game designed by LAS in partnership with OxfordSM and Vodafone, has added energy and realism to Vodafone’s F2F marketing workshop on maximising the use of customer data to drive brand value and improve customer experience.

The Issue

Vodafone wanted to encourage their marketers to work more closely with their CVM colleagues in order to respond better to customers’ needs and give them the best possible experience. 

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The Challenge

To transform a dry and data-heavy subject into an engaging topic that captures the imagination of the learners and makes them realise that there is more to data than just numbers.

The Solution

Vodafone asked leading marketing consultancy firm, OxfordSM, to help to improve the capability of their
marketers to work more effectively with the CVM team and to use the wealth of data in order to meet and exceed customer expectations.

OxfordSM brought us in to help design an innovative workshop that would combine face-to-face training with game-based elearning. The Vodafone CVM Data Game was developed specifically to be used throughout the day in the workshop delivered by OxfordSM.

In the game the workshop teams are given a challenge, have to ask for the right data, pick a customer segment to target and offer them the right proposition in the right way and at the right time. The winning team is the one that makes the most money, on time and within budget. 

Teams compete not only on the day of the workshop, but with previous participants via a global leaderboard.

Used in stages throughout the workshop, the game reinforces learning points, encourages debate and allows participants to try decisions out, resulting in a deeper
understanding of the importance of data and how it is used.

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The Results

The game approach was used because it was a really effective way to demonstrate the impact of risky decisions in a realistic simulated environment. It enables participants to make those decisions with the same pressures they experience in their jobs.

This innovative use of a game has added energy, engagement and fun to the workshops and because it is undertaken as a team activity, it has encouraged collaboration. Users leave the workshop understanding that data is more than just numbers and can really aid
behavioural profiling of customers.

 The Vodafone CVM (Customer Value Management) Data
Game, built with an elearning author tool, is a great example of how learning games don’t need to be high budget with long timescales and hand coded to be
effective. The game won gold for Best Learning Game at the eLearning Awards 2015.

"This was a tough challenge which The Customer Value Management Game and its accompanying workshop has fulfilled effectively. Not only does it build understanding but it allows marketers to practice using CVM skills whilst also replicating the pressures they face in day to day business.”

Natasha Brookes, L&D Specialist, Marketing Academy, Vodafone.

"Since the launch of the Customer Value Management Game and its accompanying workshop, I've seen our
marketing population work more effectively with their CVM colleagues to understand our existing customers better and develop propositions and GTM (Go To Market) activities that more of our customers are responding to more of the time"

Frank Wiemann, Global Head of Customer Value
Management at Vodafone 

About Vodafone

Vodafone are one of the world's leading mobile communications providers, operating in 26 countries and in partnership with networks in over 55 more. Across the world, they have almost 444 million customers and around 19.5 million in the UK. They made the first ever mobile phone call on 1 January 1985 from London to their Newbury HQ. Still located in Newbury, they now employ over 13,000 people across the UK.

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